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F. Russell: Citation: Data from the website www.theshipslist.com on the Net since 1999 by S. Swiggum and M. Kohli, file for Vessels Carrying Convicts from Great Britain, 1839-1846, A Return of all ships or Vessels hired for the conveyance of Convicts from Great Britain and Ireland, between the Ist January 1839 and the 30th June 1846, stating the Ships´ Names, Tonnage, Owner´s Name, Broker´s or Agent´s Name, Class of Ship, Rate of Freight, and when the same commenced, Number of Convicts taken on Board, when Sailed, when Sailed, Amount of Demurrage (if any), and whether engaged by Public Tender or otherwise- (in Continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 244, of Session 1839). All vessels were engaged by Public Tender. The original information for 1839-1846 came to government from James Meek, Comptroller of Victualling and Transport Services. The data derives from British Parliamentary Papers (BPP), LXV, (573) (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

G. Russell

G. Russell: Citation: Data from the website www.theshipslist.com on the Net since 1999 by S. Swiggum and M. Kohli, file for Vessels Carrying Convicts from Great Britain, 1839-1846, A Return of all ships or Vessels hired for the conveyance of Convicts from Great Britain and Ireland, between the Ist January 1839 and the 30th June 1846, stating the Ships´ Names, Tonnage, Owner´s Name, Broker´s or Agent´s Name, Class of Ship, Rate of Freight, and when the same commenced, Number of Convicts taken on Board, when Sailed, when Sailed, Amount of Demurrage (if any), and whether engaged by Public Tender or otherwise- (in Continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 244, of Session 1839). All vessels were engaged by Public Tender. The original information for 1839-1846 came to government from James Meek, Comptroller of Victualling and Transport Services. The data derives from British Parliamentary Papers (BPP), LXV, (573) (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

H. Russell

H. Russell: Citation: Data from the website www.theshipslist.com on the Net since 1999 by S. Swiggum and M. Kohli, file for Vessels Carrying Convicts from Great Britain, 1839-1846, A Return of all ships or Vessels hired for the conveyance of Convicts from Great Britain and Ireland, between the Ist January 1839 and the 30th June 1846, stating the Ships´ Names, Tonnage, Owner´s Name, Broker´s or Agent´s Name, Class of Ship, Rate of Freight, and when the same commenced, Number of Convicts taken on Board, when Sailed, when Sailed, Amount of Demurrage (if any), and whether engaged by Public Tender or otherwise- (in Continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 244, of Session 1839). All vessels were engaged by Public Tender. The original information for 1839-1846 came to government from James Meek, Comptroller of Victualling and Transport Services. The data derives from British Parliamentary Papers (BPP), LXV, (573) (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

John Pirie

1834: London Lord Mayor John Pirie (1781-1851). Shipping contractor. He is a Convict contractor. Code-Aust. Code-red. Dept-Chair PandO (co-founder with Arthur Anderson 1792-1868). Director SA Co (a founding director) and Dir NZCo and of EICo. Broeze, Brooks, p. 324 note 17 to chapter 9 that Pirie in Sep 1843 mortgaged the whole of his shipping operation to Joseph Somes, citing BT 107, London, 1832-1843, passim. Who is Lord Pirrie 1847-1924 who leads Harland and Woolf of Belfast, builders of the Titanic. He is on 1834 London c/tee for female emigration. Adams in Fatal Necessity, on NZCo. Pirie is shipowner, since 1834 London alderman of Cornhill, London Lord Mayor London in 1841, since 1832 he was interested in assisted emigration and colonisation, a member of the London Emigration Committee that employed John Marshall to conduct their single female emigration till 1836, and in Aug 1841 Pirie became chairman of those trustees when Marshall bankrupted. Pirie is director of SA Co and NZCo. He sent a coaster vessel to SA which gave name to Port Pirie. He linked with John Abel Smith qv of Magniac Smith and Co. Pirie an example of the penniless Scot who made good. See Broeze article, Imperial Axis, notes taken. V. Hope, lists. Broeze on Brooks, p. 323, Note 11, this man an official with John Abel Smith qv and Thomas Icely qv of the Australian Trust Company. Notes follow from Michael Rhodes of December 2002 - SIR JOHN PIRIE, born September 18, 1781, at Berwick on Tweed. At age 26, a ship broker and ship owner in London. Mayor of London at age 60 (in 1841). Died Champion Hill, Camberwell. February 26, 1851. Left no issue, and the baronetcy became extinct on his death. John Pirie (1781-1851), shipping operator, has been greatly underestimated as a London Lord Mayor supporting colonial endeavours. He was a director of the SA Co., and of the NZ Co., CPEFAC. The SA Colonial land and Emigration Commission of 1840 had signatories including George Fife Angas ([120]), Brooks, Gore, Brownrigg, Cummins, Mangles, Price and Co., Ellice Kinnear and Co., Pirie, Somes, Walker, Willis, James Bogle Smith, Magniac Smiths and Co., Rickards Little and Co., and AA Gower Nephews and Co. In 1832 Pirie proposed for an organisation promoting female emigration. In 1834 he was a London alderman for City Ward of Cornhill and in 1841-1842 was Lord Mayor. ([121]) His name surfaces also too little in discussions of business enterprise. Canton 506 Pirie & Co Pirie & Co A 1 5 4 - " July 29 1839 240 - - " Sept 22 1840 Jan 12 - " - Augusta Jessie 380 Pirie & Co Pirie & Co A 1 5 10 - " Sept 7 155 - - " Nov 11 " Feb 25 - " - Gilbert Henderson 428 Henderson Pirie & Co A 1 4 5 - " Oct 3 - 184 19 " Dec 12 " Apr 24 14 1 - Public Tender John Brewer 457 ditto Pirie & Co - 3 18 5 " Sept 30 200 - - " Dec 5 " Apr 6 - Emily 461 ditto Pirie & Co A 5 8 - " Apr 14 240 - - 1842 June 29 " Nov 21 Kinnear 368 Ellice Kinnear Pirie & Co A 1 4 15 - " Apr 30 174 - - " July 10 1842 Oct 23 Marion 684 W.L. Pope Pirie & Co A 1 3 16 - " Oct 4 300 - - " Nov 29 " Apr 4 Sea Queen 404 W.L. Pope Sir J. Pirie & Co A 1 3 8 - " Mar 26 - 170 - " May 11 - " - Java 1,175 J. Pirie Pirie & Co Æ 1 - 17 11 and 20s., as above 26 Oct 1841 conveying troops and stores to Gibraltar, Barbadoes and New Brunswick; in 1842, troops in Bermuda and Halifax; troops to the Cape of Good Hope; in 1843, troops to Quebec and the West Indies; in 1844, conveying stores to China, where she was discharged on 15 Jan 1845 " " Angelina 366 ditto Sir J. Pirie & Co A 1 - 20 - 22 May 1843 conveying troops to and from Quebec 3 Jan 1844 public tender Dear Mr Rhodes In reply to your enquiry of 3 February 2000, which was forwarded to us by the Public Record Office, we have a brief biographical profile of Sir John Pirie, Lord Mayor 1841-2. If you send me details of your postal address, I will be happy to send you a copy of the profile. I will also send a copy of our explanatory leaflet about sources for researching lord mayors of London, which may be of interest to you. I hope this information is useful. Amelia Thompson barque, 477 tons Sailed from Plymouth, 25th March 1841, arrived 3rd Sept, 1841 under the command of William Dawson. James Evans was Surgeon Superintendent. Wm. Thompson was the owner and Osberth Forsyth, the broker. Height between decks 6 and a half feet. John Watson first Mate, Murray second mate. William Black in charge of stores. This was the second of the 6 ships chartered by the Plymouth Company for the transport of goods and colonists to the newly founded settlement of New Plymouth, New Zealand. She was not engaged in the Australian trade route. The Amelia Thompson crossed the equator on 23 April 1841 but the prevailing south winds carried them far to the west and no progress was being made so the decision was made to break the monotony of the voyage and make for Bahia (Salvador), Brazil. After 4 days of replenishing the ship they sailed east around the Cape of Good Hope and passing through Bass Straight, Australia July 15 finally reached the New Zealand coast 28 July. Five days were spent between being becalmed and stormy weather which would not allow them into either Port Underwood (south) or Port Nicholson (north). Eventually they reached Wellington where they spent two weeks. On 13 August they sailed for New Plymouth but experienced similar conditions, having to shelter in tempestuous weather or were becalmed, reaching their destination 3 Sept. It took 13 days to unload passengers and goods as the ship lay many miles off shore as because of danger from currents, surf and reefs. Some of the longboats arrived in darkness and some were overturned but no lives were lost. It is reported there were 7 births and 7 deaths on the voyage. From there the ship returned to London via Batavia and Madras. [Posted to The Ships List by Lorrie Carter - 10 October 1997] The Amelia Thompson was a sailing bark, built in Sunderland in 1833. Lloyd's Register of Shipping for 1834-1843 gives the following details for her: Master: 1834-1835 - W. Pigot 1836-1838 - Tomlinson 1839-1843 - Dawson Owner: 1834-1835 - not given 1836-1843 - John Pirie (from 1842, Sir John Pirie, bt.) (1781-1851), merchant ship broker and ship owner of London, sheriff of London and Middlesex 1831; Alderman of Cornhill ward 1834-1851; Lord Mayor of London 1841; created baronet 13 April 1842, in consequence of the birth of the Prince of Wales during his mayoralty. Port of Registry: London Port of Survey: 1834-1835 - not given 1836-1840 - London 1840-1843 - Clydeside Destined Voyage:1834-1835 - not given 1836-1838 - Launceston 1839-1840 - Sydney 1840-1843 - New Zealand On the morning of 23 May 1843, about 80 miles east by south of Madras, the Amelia Thompson, was suddenly overtaken by a heavy squall, which completely threw her on her beam ends, and she sank. Seven seamen were drowned; Captain Dawson and the remaining crew members (the bark appears to have been on a return voyage from Australia, as there is no reference to passengers) were rescued after 2 days [full account in the London Times , 14 September 1843, p. 7e]. For possible additional information on the wreck of the Amelia Thompson, see the casualties in Lloyd's List, indexed since 1838, on microfilm, in the Lloyd's Marine Collection at the Guildhall Library. [Posted to The Ships List by 23 Oct 1997 Michael Palmer ] Rutherford and Skinner write on page 137 in The Establishment of the New Plymouth Settlement in New Zealand. "In Seffern's 'Chronicles of Taranaki,' Major C. Brown whilst on board the Cornwall (1849) returning to New Plymouth learnt from Captain Dawson the history of the Amelia Thompson. "After leaving New Zealand in 1841, she went too to the Eastern Seas, and was employed in the China war, before going off to Madras... The vessel, it appears was lost off Madras, where she was 'taken aback', and went down stern first, Captain Dawson and the crew saving themselves in quarter boats." Pirie and Co, London convict contractor of 1839 for ship Canton from TheShipsList website on Vessels Carrying Convicts From Great Britain, 1839-1846. A website from SA has: Pirie Street J13 Alderman John Pirie was a Director of The SA Company and one of its largest financiers. He had the largest shipbrokers in London. Later on, he became Lord Mayor of London and a member of The SA Society in 1840, started to uphold the Wakefield principles of our Land and Emigration Fund. One of the first ships despatched to the Colony in 1836 for the Company was the 2 masted schooner John Pirie. In 1846 this ship was the first to enter a good landing place in Spencer's Gulf since known as the town of Pt. Pirie. John Pirie had no children and died in 1851. Data on his portrait by Henry William Pickersgill. By Sir John's will his estate, after his wife's death, was to be divided in three equal parts (other than some small legacies) between his own Pirie nephew, his wife's nephew, Dr. Robert Nichol, and his wife's great-nephew, John Pirie Richardson. Sir John and Lady Pirie's niece, my great-great grandmother Annie Agnes Raymond (nee Nichol), was left Lady Pirie's 'watch chain, seals and appendages' under her will.

J. Pirie: More to come. Citation: Data from the website www.theshipslist.com on the Net since 1999 by S. Swiggum and M. Kohli, file for Vessels Carrying Convicts from Great Britain, 1839-1846, A Return of all ships or Vessels hired for the conveyance of Convicts from Great Britain and Ireland, between the Ist January 1839 and the 30th June 1846, stating the Ships´ Names, Tonnage, Owner´s Name, Broker´s or Agent´s Name, Class of Ship, Rate of Freight, and when the same commenced, Number of Convicts taken on Board, when Sailed, when Sailed, Amount of Demurrage (if any), and whether engaged by Public Tender or otherwise- (in Continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 244, of Session 1839). All vessels were engaged by Public Tender. The original information for 1839-1846 came to government from James Meek, Comptroller of Victualling and Transport Services. The data derives from British Parliamentary Papers (BPP), LXV, (573) (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

H. Russell

H. Russell: Citation: Data from the website www.theshipslist.com on the Net since 1999 by S. Swiggum and M. Kohli, file for Vessels Carrying Convicts from Great Britain, 1839-1846, A Return of all ships or Vessels hired for the conveyance of Convicts from Great Britain and Ireland, between the Ist January 1839 and the 30th June 1846, stating the Ships´ Names, Tonnage, Owner´s Name, Broker´s or Agent´s Name, Class of Ship, Rate of Freight, and when the same commenced, Number of Convicts taken on Board, when Sailed, when Sailed, Amount of Demurrage (if any), and whether engaged by Public Tender or otherwise- (in Continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 244, of Session 1839). All vessels were engaged by Public Tender. The original information for 1839-1846 came to government from James Meek, Comptroller of Victualling and Transport Services. The data derives from British Parliamentary Papers (BPP), LXV, (573) (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

Smith

Smith: Citation: Data from the website www.theshipslist.com on the Net since 1999 by S. Swiggum and M. Kohli, file for Vessels Carrying Convicts from Great Britain, 1839-1846, A Return of all ships or Vessels hired for the conveyance of Convicts from Great Britain and Ireland, between the Ist January 1839 and the 30th June 1846, stating the Ships´ Names, Tonnage, Owner´s Name, Broker´s or Agent´s Name, Class of Ship, Rate of Freight, and when the same commenced, Number of Convicts taken on Board, when Sailed, when Sailed, Amount of Demurrage (if any), and whether engaged by Public Tender or otherwise- (in Continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 244, of Session 1839). All vessels were engaged by Public Tender. The original information for 1839-1846 came to government from James Meek, Comptroller of Victualling and Transport Services. The data derives from British Parliamentary Papers (BPP), LXV, (573) (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

Labyrinth

1840: Abolition of transportation of British convicts to New South Wales, Australia. And ironically, 1840s: Depression in Sydney and NSW Australia generally has some effect on other Australian colonies. (List of dates for financial crashes and panics)

1840: At Lloyd's from 1840: (Source: PRO Copies.) Senior Lloyd's men on the Committee from 1840 include: Chairman, Thomas Chapman, deputy-chair was William Tindall. Others: Robert Barry, Timothy A. Curtis, Joseph Somes, Henry Buckle is chairman of the General Ship-Owners Society, Timothy A. Curtis a trustee. Chair of the trustees was Thomas Chapman. 1840-1870: Table of Phoenix Insurance Directors London 1840-1870: Including: J. Coope II, G. Shum Storey (a family connexion?), Sir William Curtis II finance, J. P. Muspratt mercantile, M. Attwood MP finance, O. E. Coope family, brewing, H. H. Toulmin city/gentry, T. Buxton City/gentry, Hon. J. Byng city gentry, Sir J. Lubbock, finance; Pelican insurance. (Trebilcock, p. 686.)

1840: Signatories 1840 for SA Colonial Land and Emigration Commission include: Angas, Brooks, Gore, Brownrigge, Cummins, Mangles Price and Co., Ellice Kinnear and Co., Pirie, Somes, Walker, Willis, James Bogle Smith, Magniac, Smiths and Co., Rickards Little and Co., and A. A. Gower Nephews and Co. But such moves are ended by economic downturn from 1841. (Broeze, Robert Brooks, p. 132.)

1840: In August 1840 James Cain arrives in Melbourne as agent for Robt. Brooks. In 1840s he is a pastoralist and shopkeeper in central Tasmania (with Brooks also is Henry Clayton). In 1840s, Thomas Gore and Co. at Sydney deal with John Gore in London. In 1840s, Brooks' wool agent is J. T. Simes and Co. of 58 Coleman Street, London.
Broeze, Robert Brooks, p. 117, p. 119, p. 237.

1841: Australia: In February 1841 the Montefiore Bros stop payments, let down by Sydney and the wool trade, with liabilities of about £200,000, sending shock waves in eastern Australia. Others to follow, in trouble, are: Arnold and Woollett, George Bishop, Masson and Hoggins, John Marshall. Men in less trouble are Walker Bros. and Co., John Gore and Co., Lord Mayor John Pirie. Robert Brooks is in some trouble. Also, Duncan Dunbar is involved in the bankruptcy of A. B. Sparke at Sydney, Welsh in Melbourne and Marshall in London. In other 1840s troubles, Connolly and Co. of VDL are replaced by William Borrodaile. Thomas Gore at Sydney replaced by John Gore's son Edmund Gore who is going to Sydney. Gore's reorganisation leads to Melbourne firm of Dalgety and Co., led by Frederick Gonnerman Dalgety, who later succeeded Brooks as leader of the Australian interest in the City of London. It is in 1841 that Blackheath London registers Spark as member of Blackheath Golf Club and toasts his newborn. Spark was evidently in Sydney in 1841, but he did have a son Alexander born on 30 April, and some days later be buys 9/64ths of the ship Bussorah Merchant Capt Ferrier, thence to Singapore; (Bateson's lists in Convict Ships.) Spark is one of the Union Marine Assurance Co. In August 1841 he sees arrival of ship Hope from Macao with Spark's 2500 chests of tea and 80 tons of sugar, and a new correspondent, Macvicar and Co., consignment worth over £3400. (See Abbott and Little, p. 136 and previous. In 1841, the failure of Duke and Co. would lost Spark £5000. Spark's London agent is John Masson, who bankrupted. (Broeze, Robert Brooks, pp. 160-161.)

1841: The Chinese are defeated by the British in the First Opium War. Along with paying a large indemnity, Hong Kong is ceded to the British. From website based on book: Opium: A History, by Martin Booth Simon and Schuster, Ltd., 1996. e-mail info@opioids.com

The China Coast nd

1841: By 1841, British migrant brokers working to Australia include John Marshall, Masson and Higgins, especially Carter and Bonus (Robert Carter of Bank of British North America, and the North American Colonization Assoc. of Ireland along with Joseph Somes, J. A. Smith, John Chapman, Russell Ellice, Ross Mangles, Sir Edward Parry). Carter and Bonus deal with UBA in 1840, in 1841 dealing with Brooks and John Gore for regular migrant carriage. In the 1840s, in London the Montefiore Bros fail. In Melbourne in the 1840s were a firm Were Bros and Co (including senior partner Jonathan Binns Were of colonial UBA, and Were sometimes acted for Carter and Bonus re emigration) (Did they have links with Robarts, Curtis, Were of London?) Robert Carter came on the UBA board in Dec 1841. (Broeze, Robert Brooks, p. 131.)

1841: In 1841, a close associate of Cummins, Brooks and Gore at UBA is Robert Carter (died 1878 leaving fortune of about £60,000) of City shipbrokers Carter and Bonus. In 1841, bankruptcies start to hit the City of London. In 1841 in NSW Robert Campbell Jnr is working Australasian whaling goods. In 1834-1841 the major London importers of Australian wool are: Walker Bros., John Gore and Co., Robert Brooks, Montefiore Bros., Donaldson and Co., Buckles and Co., Bettington, Cockerell and Co., Marsden and Flower, Rawdon, Cooper and Co., Warre Bros., J. Masson, J. Hosking, Reid, Irving and Co., Scotts, Bell and Co., John Flower, A. A. Gower Nephews and Co., Magniac Smiths and Co., London agents for Jardine Matheson; not including at Liverpool, Aspinall Browne and Co. (Broeze, Robert Brooks, p. 102, p. 108, p. 224 on name Bonus.)

1841: March 1841, Australasian trade men meet re emigration regulations to Australia, including Buckle, Brooks, Gore, Donaldson, Lambert, Willis, Angas, Cummins, Thomas Icely, Alexander Smith of Liverpool, John Gilchrist from Glasgow (once resident in Sydney as director of UBA). All approve the ideas of emigration agent John Marshall. (Broeze, Robert Brooks, p. 133)

1841: In 1841, British government stops bounty payments for emigration to Australia. The operators upset included John, Marshall, Pirie, Duncan Dunbar (about 1848 he sends seven ships to South Australia, Thomas Ward, wine merchant Frederick Friend, UBA chairman Cummins. (Broeze, Robert Brooks, p. 134, p. 216.)

1841: In about 1841 Ross D. Mangles personally visits Wellington, New Zealand re banking, etc.

1844: On British merchant in the Australia trade, Robert Brooks: MP, shipowner, convict contractor, merchant-banker. Robert W. Brooks (1790-1882), a man obsessed by and totally devoted to business. Robert Brooks was apprenticed to Hull timber merchant John Barkworth. (Broeze on Brooks, p. 299, Note 8.) He was a Conservative. (Stenton on British Parliamentarians, p. 50. His own entry in English DNB 2004 edition, by Frank Broeze.) He assisted Caroline Chisholm. Convict contractor. Brooks was associated with Union Bank Australia (UBA). A member of Jerusalem Coffee House, where all merchants of the Australia trade would meet as would members of London's General Shipowners' Society. (See Burke's Landed Gentry for Younghusband formerly of Prior House.) By 1832 Brooks dealt with Launceston merchant Michael Connolly who links to Thomas Hewitt at Hobart, who linked to John Gore and Co. of London, exporters from England and importers of Australian wool to Britain. He had links to A. Fenn Kemp in Tasmania and Raine and Ramsay at Sydney. Family tradition is that he bought the first bale of Australian wool auctioned by the Lord Mayor himself of London. Brooks´ father invests with Hull timber merchant John Barkworth who first trained Robert Brooks in business. John Barkworth had a son Thomas and a connection, Joseph Dowson. Both the houses of Dalgetys and Elders can trace some origins to the 1830s with John Gore and Robert Brooks. Brooks and John Gore in London were directors of the London Dock Company by the late 1830s. Brooks earlier had become an agency house for Ceylon, had earlier tried coffee from there, then tea (he backed the Bousteads of Ceylon). (Broeze on Brooks p. 342 has it that Brooks largely controlled the firm of tea handlers in Ceylon, Boustead Bros, citing Sir Thomas Villiers, Mercantile Lore., Colombo 1940, and this info is not in D. M. Forrest, A Hundred Years of Ceylon Tea, 1867-1967, London, 1967, which latter is taken as a standard history. Cf A. Ellis, Heir of Adventure: the story of Brown, Shipley and Co, Merchant Bankers 1810-1960. Cf., Broeze, British Intercontinental Shipping and Australia, 1813-1850.)
Brooks helped to found Younghusband and Co., wool dealers of Melbourne. Before 1846 Brooks was one of the largest importers of Australian wool and in 1846 was chairman of NSW and VDL Commercial Association which regulated the London auctions of Australian wool. Various UBA directors in touch with Brooks were Joseph Dowson, Rbt Campbell, William Fletcher, Frederick Dalgety and Sir Charles Nicholson. He was also in the Australasian Coal Mining Co. of 1853 and in Australasian Gold Mining Co. Brooks extended credit via UBA to Gold Mining Co. at Bathurst. And He joined Enderbys in 1849 with the Southern Whale Fishery. He raised funds for Caroline Chisholm but had no involvement in SA, NZ or WA Companies. (There were fourteen whaler ships in the 1850s.) Brooks had links to Thomas Icely, and the firm R. Town and Co., had partner Alexander Stuart 1824-1886 a colonial treasurer and in 1883-1885 premier of NSW. In the 1860s Brooks had shipowning, wharfage, ship repair, Australian coastal trade, regional tea and sugar hauls, Pacific sandalwood trade, trade to Calcutta, some voyages to Britain, and Towns, with sugar and kanakas. At some time Brooks had a Melbourne agent James Cain. The Union Bank (some directors were Philip Oakden, George Fife Angas and chairman from 1829-1862 Lord Mayor Sir Peter Laurie) was rival in London to Bank of Australasia. Brooks was chairman of the NSW and VDL Commercial Assoc, a founding director of Union Bank. He had an estate Woodcote Park at Epsom. In 1855 he partnered with Robert Spence as Robert Brooks and Co. Later made profits in the Australian gold rush and Crimean war. (See Broeze's essay on this man in Appleyard and Schedvin.) Brooks is named as a convict contractor (the info does not surface from Bateson´s Convict Ships) in roundtable on Broeze and Mr Brooks in International Journal of Maritime History, Vol. 6, No. 2, Dec. 1994, p. 201, in a comment by John Hackman that Brooks sent convicts to VDL, his ships still carried convicts in 1850, yet in 1851 he was on the society for Promotion of Colonisation that was anti-transportation in outlook. (Broeze, p. 203 has it that by 1844 Brooks was the third-largest importer of wool from Aust and by 1846 he was chairman of the Committee of the NSW and VDL Merchants' Commercial Association; p. 203, in 1848 Brooks had enough prestige to be called before the 1848 Select Committee on Navigation Acts; p. 203, Brooks in 1847 had 12 ships, alternatively employed as cargo, migrant or convict carriers. re ship turnarounds, he handled goods for other merchants or exporters. In 1848 his ship Kinnear benefited when Brook's agent Robert Towns contracted to carry mail. And p. 202 of Broeze, British Intercontinental, Brooks was quite "single-minded" that all his ships made outward voyages to Australia and he preferred to load them for home in Australia itself.
Brooks was a member of the first committee re Family Colonization Loan Society, see Fifty-One Pieces of Wedding Cake, pp. 272-273. (Cf., Correspondence between London and Australia by the English based banks 1838/ 1900, Holt, F. S., Australian Society of Archivists. Conference 1981: Promoting the Better Use of Archives in Australia [Article : 1981]. Keywords: Bank of Australasia; London Chartered Bank of Australia; Bank of South Australia.) The Brooks Will (dated 17 February, 1871) of Mr. Robert Brooks, J. P., late of St. Peter's-chambers, Cornhill, and of Woodcote Park, Epson, who died on the 5th ult., was proved on the 29th by Robert Alexander Brooks, Henry Brooks, and Herbert Brooks, the sons, the executors, the value of the personal estate amounting to upwards of £378,000. The testator leaves to his wife, Mrs. Hannah Brooks, his household furniture, jewellery, plate, pictures, books, horses, carriages, farming stock, and effects, £2000, and an annuity of £2500; she is also to have the use and enjoyment of his mansion house and estate, Woodcote Park, for life, but, if she elects so to do, she is to have instead an additional annuity of £500. On the termination of Mrs. Brooks's interest in the said estate, testator's and three sons are to have respectively, according to seniority, the option of purchasing it. To his grandson, Ernest Walter, the son of his deceased son Walter, he bequeaths £10,000; upon trust for his daughter, Mrs. May Browning, £10,000; and upon trust for his son, Arthur £8000. The residue of his real and personal estate he gives to his sons Robert Alexander, Henry, and Herbert. The deceased was the Conservative member of the House of Commons for Weymouth from 1859 to 1868. Source: The Illustrated London News, No.2254—Vol. LXXXI, Saturday, July 15, 1882, p. 74.

Year 1843

15 February 1843: 1843: R. Barry: Re convict transport Gilmore 500 tons of 1843, brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 15 February, 254 male convicts. Sailed 14 April, arrived 20 August 1843.

4 March 1843: W. Mitcheson, owner of convict transport East London 335 tons of 1843, brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 4 March, 133 female convicts and 49 children. Sailed 10 May, arrived 28 September.

W. Mitcheson

W. Mitcheson, owner of convict transport East London 335 tons of 1843, brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 4 March, 133 female convicts and 49 children. Sailed 10 May, arrived 28 September. Otherwise still a problem person for research by October 2012.

W. Mitcheson: Data from the website www.theshipslist.com on the Net since 1999 by S. Swiggum and M. Kohli, file for Vessels Carrying Convicts from Great Britain, 1839-1846, A Return of all ships or Vessels hired for the conveyance of Convicts from Great Britain and Ireland, between the Ist January 1839 and the 30th June 1846, stating the Ships´ Names, Tonnage, Owner´s Name, Broker´s or Agent´s Name, Class of Ship, Rate of Freight, and when the same commenced, Number of Convicts taken on Board, when Sailed, when Sailed, Amount of Demurrage (if any), and whether engaged by Public Tender or otherwise- (in Continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 244, of Session 1839). All vessels were engaged by Public Tender. The original information for 1839-1846 came to government from James Meek, Comptroller of Victualling and Transport Services. The data derives from British Parliamentary Papers (BPP), LXV, (573) (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

14 March 1843: J. Heming, Owner of convict transport Constant, 445 tons, of 1843, brokered by Havside and Co. Commenced 14 March, 204 male convicts. Sailed 9 May, arrived 29 August.

J. Heming

J. Heming, Owner of convict transport Constant, 445 tons, of 1843, brokered by Havside and Co. Commenced 14 March, 204 male convicts. Sailed 9 May, arrived 29 August. Otherwise, still a problem person for research by October 2012.

J. Heming: Citation: Data from the website www.theshipslist.com on the Net since 1999 by S. Swiggum and M. Kohli, file for Vessels Carrying Convicts from Great Britain, 1839-1846, A Return of all ships or Vessels hired for the conveyance of Convicts from Great Britain and Ireland, between the Ist January 1839 and the 30th June 1846, stating the Ships´ Names, Tonnage, Owner´s Name, Broker´s or Agent´s Name, Class of Ship, Rate of Freight, and when the same commenced, Number of Convicts taken on Board, when Sailed, when Sailed, Amount of Demurrage (if any), and whether engaged by Public Tender or otherwise- (in Continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 244, of Session 1839). All vessels were engaged by Public Tender. The original information for 1839-1846 came to government from James Meek, Comptroller of Victualling and Transport Services. The data derives from British Parliamentary Papers (BPP), LXV, (573) (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

17 April 1843: James Allen, owner of convict transport Asiatic, 406 tons of 1843. Brokered by Chapmans. Commenced 17 April, 188 male convicts. Sailed 28 May, arrived 23 September, 1843.

James Allen

James Allen: Data from the website www.theshipslist.com on the Net since 1999 by S. Swiggum and M. Kohli, file for Vessels Carrying Convicts from Great Britain, 1839-1846, A Return of all ships or Vessels hired for the conveyance of Convicts from Great Britain and Ireland, between the Ist January 1839 and the 30th June 1846, stating the Ships´ Names, Tonnage, Owner´s Name, Broker´s or Agent´s Name, Class of Ship, Rate of Freight, and when the same commenced, Number of Convicts taken on Board, when Sailed, when Sailed, Amount of Demurrage (if any), and whether engaged by Public Tender or otherwise- (in Continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 244, of Session 1839). All vessels were engaged by Public Tender. The original information for 1839-1846 came to government from James Meek, Comptroller of Victualling and Transport Services. The data derives from British Parliamentary Papers (BPP), LXV, (573) (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

R. Barry

R. Barry: Re convict transport Gilmore 500 tons of 1843, brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 15 February, 254 male convicts. Sailed 14 April, arrived 20 August 1843.

R. Barry: Data from the website www.theshipslist.com on the Net since 1999 by S. Swiggum and M. Kohli, file for Vessels Carrying Convicts from Great Britain, 1839-1846, A Return of all ships or Vessels hired for the conveyance of Convicts from Great Britain and Ireland, between the Ist January 1839 and the 30th June 1846, stating the Ships´ Names, Tonnage, Owner´s Name, Broker´s or Agent´s Name, Class of Ship, Rate of Freight, and when the same commenced, Number of Convicts taken on Board, when Sailed, when Sailed, Amount of Demurrage (if any), and whether engaged by Public Tender or otherwise- (in Continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 244, of Session 1839). All vessels were engaged by Public Tender. The original information for 1839-1846 came to government from James Meek, Comptroller of Victualling and Transport Services. The data derives from British Parliamentary Papers (BPP), LXV, (573) (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

On Thomas Barry. More to come.

12 May 1843: McCalmont, possibly of Liverpool. Owner of convict transport Henrietta 442 tons of 1843, brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 12 May for 190 male convicts. Sailed 12 July, arrived 19 November. (This McCalmont name was probably not connected with the banker name, McCalmont Brothers, of the later nineteenth century in London, who had interests in North America - Ed.)

McCalmont and Co.

Owner of convict transport Henrietta 442 tons of 1843, brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 12 May for 190 male convicts. Sailed 12 July, arrived 19 November. Still a problem person for research by October 2012.

This McCalmont name was probably not connected with the banker name, McCalmont Brothers, of the later nineteenth century in London, who had interests in North America.

McCalmont: Citation: Data from the website www.theshipslist.com on the Net since 1999 by S. Swiggum and M. Kohli, file for Vessels Carrying Convicts from Great Britain, 1839-1846, A Return of all ships or Vessels hired for the conveyance of Convicts from Great Britain and Ireland, between the Ist January 1839 and the 30th June 1846, stating the Ships´ Names, Tonnage, Owner´s Name, Broker´s or Agent´s Name, Class of Ship, Rate of Freight, and when the same commenced, Number of Convicts taken on Board, when Sailed, when Sailed, Amount of Demurrage (if any), and whether engaged by Public Tender or otherwise- (in Continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 244, of Session 1839). All vessels were engaged by Public Tender. The original information for 1839-1846 came to government from James Meek, Comptroller of Victualling and Transport Services. The data derives from British Parliamentary Papers (BPP), LXV, (573) (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

12 May 1843: C. Ingram. Owner of convict transport Forfarshire, 508 tons of 1843, brokered by Havside. Commenced 12 May for 240 male convicts. Sailed 27 June, arrived 13 October 1843.

C. Ingram

Owner of convict transport Forfarshire, 508 tons of 1843, brokered by Havside. Commenced 12 May for 240 male convicts. Sailed 27 June, arrived 13 October 1843. Otherwise, still a problem person for research by October 2012.

C. Ingram: Citation: Data from the website www.theshipslist.com on the Net since 1999 by S. Swiggum and M. Kohli, file for Vessels Carrying Convicts from Great Britain, 1839-1846, A Return of all ships or Vessels hired for the conveyance of Convicts from Great Britain and Ireland, between the Ist January 1839 and the 30th June 1846, stating the Ships´ Names, Tonnage, Owner´s Name, Broker´s or Agent´s Name, Class of Ship, Rate of Freight, and when the same commenced, Number of Convicts taken on Board, when Sailed, when Sailed, Amount of Demurrage (if any), and whether engaged by Public Tender or otherwise- (in Continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 244, of Session 1839). All vessels were engaged by Public Tender. The original information for 1839-1846 came to government from James Meek, Comptroller of Victualling and Transport Services. The data derives from British Parliamentary Papers (BPP), LXV, (573) (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

20 May 1843: 1843: Owner of convict transport Emerald Isle, 501 tons, brokered by Chambers. Commenced 20 May for 214 male convicts. Sailed 30 June and arrived 12 October 1843.

7 June 1843: J. Walters, owner of convict transport Lady of the Lake of 1843, 243 tons, brokered by Walters. Commenced 7 June 1843, 100 male convicts. Sailed 26 July 1843, arrived 18 August 1843.

J. Walters

J. Walters, owner of convict transport Lady of the Lake of 1843, 243 tons, brokered by Walters. Commenced 7 June 1843, 100 male convicts. Sailed 26 July 1843, arrived 18 August 1843. Otherwise, still a problem person for research by October 2012.

J. Walters: Citation: Data from the website www.theshipslist.com on the Net since 1999 by S. Swiggum and M. Kohli, file for Vessels Carrying Convicts from Great Britain, 1839-1846, A Return of all ships or Vessels hired for the conveyance of Convicts from Great Britain and Ireland, between the Ist January 1839 and the 30th June 1846, stating the Ships´ Names, Tonnage, Owner´s Name, Broker´s or Agent´s Name, Class of Ship, Rate of Freight, and when the same commenced, Number of Convicts taken on Board, when Sailed, when Sailed, Amount of Demurrage (if any), and whether engaged by Public Tender or otherwise- (in Continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 244, of Session 1839). All vessels were engaged by Public Tender. The original information for 1839-1846 came to government from James Meek, Comptroller of Victualling and Transport Services. The data derives from British Parliamentary Papers (BPP), LXV, (573) (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

12 June 1843: W. Tayte, owner of convict transport Orator of 1843, 369 tons, brokered by Tayte. Commenced 12 June 1843, 170 male convicts. Sailed 12 August 1843, arrived 21 November 1843.

W. Tayte

W. Tayte, owner of convict transport Orator of 1843, 369 tons, brokered by Tayte. Commenced 12 June 1843, 170 male convicts. Sailed 12 August 1843, arrived 21 November 1843. Otherwise, still a problem person for research by October 2012.

Tayte: (Perhaps Tate or Taite?) Citation: Data from the website www.theshipslist.com on the Net since 1999 by S. Swiggum and M. Kohli, file for Vessels Carrying Convicts from Great Britain, 1839-1846, A Return of all ships or Vessels hired for the conveyance of Convicts from Great Britain and Ireland, between the Ist January 1839 and the 30th June 1846, stating the Ships´ Names, Tonnage, Owner´s Name, Broker´s or Agent´s Name, Class of Ship, Rate of Freight, and when the same commenced, Number of Convicts taken on Board, when Sailed, when Sailed, Amount of Demurrage (if any), and whether engaged by Public Tender or otherwise- (in Continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 244, of Session 1839). All vessels were engaged by Public Tender. The original information for 1839-1846 came to government from James Meek, Comptroller of Victualling and Transport Services. The data derives from British Parliamentary Papers (BPP), LXV, (573) (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

27 June 1843: Tebbut and Co., owner of convict transport Woodbridge of 1843, 516 tons, brokered by Tebbut and Co. Commenced 27 June 1843, 204 female convicts. Sailed 30 August 1843, arrived 25 December 1843.

21 July 1843: Ward, owner of convict transport Navarino of 1842, 403 tons, brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 21 July 1842, 180 male convicts. Sailed 22 September 1842, arrived 10 January 1843.

15 August 1843: R. Leslie, owner of convict transport Duke of Richmond, 420 tons of 1843. brokered by Leslie. Commenced 15 August for 111 male convicts. Sailed 21 September, arrived 2 December 1843.

R. Leslie

R. Leslie, owner of convict transport Duke of Richmond, 420 tons of 1843. brokered by Leslie. Commenced 15 August for 111 male convicts. Sailed 21 September, arrived 2 December 1843. Still a problem person for research by October 2012.

R. Leslie: Citation: Data from the website www.theshipslist.com on the Net since 1999 by S. Swiggum and M. Kohli, file for Vessels Carrying Convicts from Great Britain, 1839-1846, A Return of all ships or Vessels hired for the conveyance of Convicts from Great Britain and Ireland, between the Ist January 1839 and the 30th June 1846, stating the Ships´ Names, Tonnage, Owner´s Name, Broker´s or Agent´s Name, Class of Ship, Rate of Freight, and when the same commenced, Number of Convicts taken on Board, when Sailed, when Sailed, Amount of Demurrage (if any), and whether engaged by Public Tender or otherwise- (in Continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 244, of Session 1839). All vessels were engaged by Public Tender. The original information for 1839-1846 came to government from James Meek, Comptroller of Victualling and Transport Services. The data derives from British Parliamentary Papers (BPP), LXV, (573) (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

23 September 1843: Owner of convict transport John Renwick of 1842, 402 tons, brokered by Godwin. Commenced 23 September, 156 female convicts, 20 children. Sailed 30 December, arrived 19 July 1843.

W. Campbell

W. Campbell, owner of convict transport Emma Eugenia, 383 tons of 1843. Commenced 30 September for 170 female convicts. Sailed 23 November, arrived 2 April 1844.

W. Campbell: Citation: Data from the website www.theshipslist.com on the Net since 1999 by S. Swiggum and M. Kohli, file for Vessels Carrying Convicts from Great Britain, 1839-1846, A Return of all ships or Vessels hired for the conveyance of Convicts from Great Britain and Ireland, between the Ist January 1839 and the 30th June 1846, stating the Ships´ Names, Tonnage, Owner´s Name, Broker´s or Agent´s Name, Class of Ship, Rate of Freight, and when the same commenced, Number of Convicts taken on Board, when Sailed, when Sailed, Amount of Demurrage (if any), and whether engaged by Public Tender or otherwise- (in Continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 244, of Session 1839). All vessels were engaged by Public Tender. The original information for 1839-1846 came to government from James Meek, Comptroller of Victualling and Transport Services. The data derives from British Parliamentary Papers (BPP), LXV, (573) (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

4 October 1843: W. L. Pope, owner of convict transport Marion of 1843, 684 tons, brokered by Pirie and Co. Commenced 4 October 1843, 300 male convicts. Sailed 29 November 1843, arrived 4 April 1843.

11 December 1843: Ward, owner of convict transport Equestrian of 1843, 659 tons, brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 11 December 1843, 290 male convicts. Sailed 28 January 1843, arrived 2 May 1843.

F. Chambers

Owner of convict transport Emerald Isle, 501 tons, brokered by Chambers. Commenced 20 May for 214 male convicts. Sailed 30 June and arrived 12 October 1843.

J. Comes

J. Comes, owner of convict transport Lord Petre, 531 tons of 1843, brokered by Chapman. Commenced 1 May, 238 male convicts. Sailed 4 July, arrived 15 October 1843. Remaining a problem person for research by October 2012

J. Comes: Citation: Data from the website www.theshipslist.com on the Net since 1999 by S. Swiggum and M. Kohli, file for Vessels Carrying Convicts from Great Britain, 1839-1846, A Return of all ships or Vessels hired for the conveyance of Convicts from Great Britain and Ireland, between the Ist January 1839 and the 30th June 1846, stating the Ships´ Names, Tonnage, Owner´s Name, Broker´s or Agent´s Name, Class of Ship, Rate of Freight, and when the same commenced, Number of Convicts taken on Board, when Sailed, when Sailed, Amount of Demurrage (if any), and whether engaged by Public Tender or otherwise- (in Continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 244, of Session 1839). All vessels were engaged by Public Tender. The original information for 1839-1846 came to government from James Meek, Comptroller of Victualling and Transport Services. The data derives from British Parliamentary Papers (BPP), LXV, (573) (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

Year 1844

10 January 1844: Thomas Farncomb, Owner of convict transport Greenlaw, 406 tons, of 1844 brokered by Hill and Co. Commenced 10 January for 210 male convicts. Sailed 5 March and arrived 2 July 1844.

Thomas Farncomb

Farncomb, Owner of convict transport Greenlaw, 406 tons, of 1844 brokered by Hill and Co. Commenced 10 January for 210 male convicts. Sailed 5 March and arrived 2 July 1844.

Thomas Farncombe: (1779-1865) Bachelor. He was London Lord Mayor of 1849 or 1851 (?), a tallow chandler. (Valerie Hope listings, p. 148.) Farncombe was a merchant, shipowner and wharfinger, and an early promoter of the London and Westminster Bank. A native of Hastings, Sussex. From a website: Thomas Farncombe - a wharfinger, a Master of the Tallow Chandler’s Company, future Lord Mayor and 'Old Tory Queen'. Lived at 12 Holyard House, Kennington Common but his country home was Rose Hill, Surrey. He came from an ‘Old Sussex landowning family’ and was at one time the ‘largest wharf owner on Surrey side’ ‑ a merchant, shipowner and banker and a magistrate of Surrey and Sussex. He was Lord Mayor of London in 1851 and as such presided at the Great Exhibition. London convict contractor of 1844 for convict transport Greenlaw from TheShipsList website on Vessels Carrying Convicts From Great Britain, 1839-1846. (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

T. Farncomb: Was uncle of later London Lord Mayor David Henry Stone (1812-1890) of Fairwood, 53 Sydenham Hill (built 1862) from 1864 to about 1869. Citation: Data from the website www.theshipslist.com on the Net since 1999 by S. Swiggum and M. Kohli, file for Vessels Carrying Convicts from Great Britain, 1839-1846, A Return of all ships or Vessels hired for the conveyance of Convicts from Great Britain and Ireland, between the Ist January 1839 and the 30th June 1846, stating the Ships´ Names, Tonnage, Owner´s Name, Broker´s or Agent´s Name, Class of Ship, Rate of Freight, and when the same commenced, Number of Convicts taken on Board, when Sailed, when Sailed, Amount of Demurrage (if any), and whether engaged by Public Tender or otherwise- (in Continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 244, of Session 1839). All vessels were engaged by Public Tender. The original information for 1839-1846 came to government from James Meek, Comptroller of Victualling and Transport Services. The data derives from British Parliamentary Papers (BPP), LXV, (573) (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

This file remains Work-in-Progress

24 January 1844: R. L Hunter: Owner of convict transport Blundell, 520 tons, brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 24 January for 210 male convicts. Sailed 18 March and arrived 2 July 1844.

R. L. Hunter

Owner of convict transport Blundell, 520 tons, brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 24 January for 210 male convicts. Sailed 18 March and arrived 2 July 1844. Otherwise, still a problem person for research by October 2012.

Owner of convict transport John Calvin, 419 tons, brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 26 March 1846 for 200 male convicts. Sailed 12 May and arrived not reported.

R. L. Hunter: Citation: Data from the website www.theshipslist.com on the Net since 1999 by S. Swiggum and M. Kohli, file for Vessels Carrying Convicts from Great Britain, 1839-1846, A Return of all ships or Vessels hired for the conveyance of Convicts from Great Britain and Ireland, between the Ist January 1839 and the 30th June 1846, stating the Ships´ Names, Tonnage, Owner´s Name, Broker´s or Agent´s Name, Class of Ship, Rate of Freight, and when the same commenced, Number of Convicts taken on Board, when Sailed, when Sailed, Amount of Demurrage (if any), and whether engaged by Public Tender or otherwise- (in Continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 244, of Session 1839). All vessels were engaged by Public Tender. The original information for 1839-1846 came to government from James Meek, Comptroller of Victualling and Transport Services. The data derives from British Parliamentary Papers (BPP), LXV, (573) (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

26 January 1844: H. Shuttleworth, owner of convict transport London of 1844, 611 tons, brokered by Haviside. Commenced 26 January 1844, 250 male convicts. Sailed 18 March 1844, arrived 10 July 1844.

H. Shuttleworth

H. Shuttleworth, owner of convict transport London of 1844, 611 tons, brokered by Haviside. Commenced 26 January 1844, 250 male convicts. Sailed 18 March 1844, arrived 10 July 1844. Otherwise, still a problem person for research by October 2012.

H. Shuttleworth: Citation: Data from the website www.theshipslist.com on the Net since 1999 by S. Swiggum and M. Kohli, file for Vessels Carrying Convicts from Great Britain, 1839-1846, A Return of all ships or Vessels hired for the conveyance of Convicts from Great Britain and Ireland, between the Ist January 1839 and the 30th June 1846, stating the Ships´ Names, Tonnage, Owner´s Name, Broker´s or Agent´s Name, Class of Ship, Rate of Freight, and when the same commenced, Number of Convicts taken on Board, when Sailed, when Sailed, Amount of Demurrage (if any), and whether engaged by Public Tender or otherwise- (in Continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 244, of Session 1839). All vessels were engaged by Public Tender. The original information for 1839-1846 came to government from James Meek, Comptroller of Victualling and Transport Services. The data derives from British Parliamentary Papers (BPP), LXV, (573) (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

Thomas Haviside

Thomas Haviside, (1787-1862) Married Frederica Markham. He is of Rectory Manor House, of Church Hill Walthamstow. London Shipping agents. There was an Anthony Haviside of Bucklersbury partner with Charles Harvik. T. Haviside and Co. were probably of Sun Court or 69 Cornhill, London.

Thomas Haviside: Citation: Data from the website www.theshipslist.com on the Net since 1999 by S. Swiggum and M. Kohli, file for Vessels Carrying Convicts from Great Britain, 1839-1846, A Return of all ships or Vessels hired for the conveyance of Convicts from Great Britain and Ireland, between the Ist January 1839 and the 30th June 1846, stating the Ships´ Names, Tonnage, Owner´s Name, Broker´s or Agent´s Name, Class of Ship, Rate of Freight, and when the same commenced, Number of Convicts taken on Board, when Sailed, when Sailed, Amount of Demurrage (if any), and whether engaged by Public Tender or otherwise- (in Continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 244, of Session 1839). All vessels were engaged by Public Tender. The original information for 1839-1846 came to government from James Meek, Comptroller of Victualling and Transport Services. The data derives from British Parliamentary Papers (BPP), LXV, (573) (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

16 May 1844: Owner of convict transport Emily, 448 tons of 1844, brokered by Halket. Commenced 16 May for 205 male convicts. Sailed 14 July and arrived 30 October 1844.

21 May 1844: Ward, owner of convict transport Lord Auckland of 1844, 516 tons, brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 21 May 1844, 238 male convicts. Sailed 16 July 1844, arrived 15 November 1844.

28 May 1844: J. Gilmore, owner of convict transport William Jardine, 553 tons of 1844, brokered by Gilmore. Commenced 28 May for 270 male convicts. Sailed 11 Augsut, arrived 20 November 1844.

20 July 1844: R. Greenwell, owner of convict transport Sir Robert Peel, 610 tons of 1844, brokered by Edridge. Commenced 20 July for 254 convicts. Sailed 9 September and arrived 26 December 1844. (By 1819 there were at Middle Hendon, Sunderland, some shippers named J. & R. Greenwell [Robert Greenwell? Of a ship repair yard?].)

R. Greenwell

R. Greenwell, owner of convict transport Sir Robert Peel, 610 tons of 1844, brokered by Edridge. Commenced 20 July for 254 convicts. Sailed 9 September and arrived 26 December 1844.

R. Greenwell: Citation: Data from the website www.theshipslist.com on the Net since 1999 by S. Swiggum and M. Kohli, file for Vessels Carrying Convicts from Great Britain, 1839-1846, A Return of all ships or Vessels hired for the conveyance of Convicts from Great Britain and Ireland, between the Ist January 1839 and the 30th June 1846, stating the Ships´ Names, Tonnage, Owner´s Name, Broker´s or Agent´s Name, Class of Ship, Rate of Freight, and when the same commenced, Number of Convicts taken on Board, when Sailed, when Sailed, Amount of Demurrage (if any), and whether engaged by Public Tender or otherwise- (in Continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 244, of Session 1839). All vessels were engaged by Public Tender. The original information for 1839-1846 came to government from James Meek, Comptroller of Victualling and Transport Services. The data derives from British Parliamentary Papers (BPP), LXV, (573) (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

27 July 1844: A. Riddell, owner of convict transport Tasmania of 1844, 412 tons, brokered by Devitt and Moore. Commenced 27 July 1844, 192 female convicts. Sailed 7 September 1844, arrived 26 December 1844.

Note for 1879: Sir Thomas Devitt Bart1 (1839-1923). He is President of Institute of Shipbrokers, a senior Partner of Devitt and Moore of 84 Leadenhall St. Chairman of Lloyd's Register of Shipping. He was also a forty-year partner of F. Green and Co., shipowners; the joining of the firms was operative from December 1879. Cf., Mac Gordon and Simon Kelleher, The Gordons of Manar in Australia: 150 years. Parramatta, Macarthur Press, 1991. He was of Hackney, Midx. Cf., Capt. A. G. Course, Painted Ports: The Story of the Ships of Devitt and Moore. London, Hollis and Carter, 1961. A later co-partner in the firm is Howson Charles Devitt, a cousin of Sir Thomas. On 1 Feb. 1929, Mr E. Verner and H. E. Verner established Verner, Son and Eggar, of 3 Billiter Ave., London and took over the whole business of Devitt and Moore. See Burke's P&B for Tritton. Noted in Cassis, City Bankers, p. 170. He became a London director of Bank of NSW. He also had a part of development of the Orient Line. ()See thepeerage.com.) His son is listed in Burke's Landed Gentry for Woolcombe. Burke´s P&B for Devitt.

A. Riddell

A. Riddell, owner of convict transport Tasmania of 1844, 412 tons, brokered by Devitt and Moore. Commenced 27 July 1844, 192 female convicts. Sailed 7 September 1844, arrived 26 December 1844. Otherwise, still a problem person for research by October 2012.

A. Riddell, owner of convict transport Tasmania of 1845, 412 tons, brokered by Devitt and Moore. Commenced 23 July 1845, 138 female convicts and 36 children. Sailed 2 September 1845, arrived 3 December 1845.

A. Riddell is a little-known name: Citation: Data from the website www.theshipslist.com on the Net since 1999 by S. Swiggum and M. Kohli, file for Vessels Carrying Convicts from Great Britain, 1839-1846, A Return of all ships or Vessels hired for the conveyance of Convicts from Great Britain and Ireland, between the Ist January 1839 and the 30th June 1846, stating the Ships´ Names, Tonnage, Owner´s Name, Broker´s or Agent´s Name, Class of Ship, Rate of Freight, and when the same commenced, Number of Convicts taken on Board, when Sailed, when Sailed, Amount of Demurrage (if any), and whether engaged by Public Tender or otherwise- (in Continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 244, of Session 1839). All vessels were engaged by Public Tender. The original information for 1839-1846 came to government from James Meek, Comptroller of Victualling and Transport Services. The data derives from British Parliamentary Papers (BPP), LXV, (573) (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

Devitt and Moore

Devitt and Moore: Shipbrokers: Citation: Data from the website www.theshipslist.com on the Net since 1999 by S. Swiggum and M. Kohli, file for Vessels Carrying Convicts from Great Britain, 1839-1846, A Return of all ships or Vessels hired for the conveyance of Convicts from Great Britain and Ireland, between the Ist January 1839 and the 30th June 1846, stating the Ships´ Names, Tonnage, Owner´s Name, Broker´s or Agent´s Name, Class of Ship, Rate of Freight, and when the same commenced, Number of Convicts taken on Board, when Sailed, when Sailed, Amount of Demurrage (if any), and whether engaged by Public Tender or otherwise- (in Continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 244, of Session 1839). All vessels were engaged by Public Tender. The original information for 1839-1846 came to government from James Meek, Comptroller of Victualling and Transport Services. The data derives from British Parliamentary Papers (BPP), LXV, (573) (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

30 September 1844: W. Campbell, owner of convict transport Emma Eugenia, 383 tons of 1843. Commenced 30 September for 170 female convicts. Sailed 23 November, arrived 2 April 1844.

20 December 1844: Gray, owner of convict transport Elizabeth and Henry, 426 tons of 1844, brokered by J. W. Gray. Commenced 20 December for 200 male convicts. Sailed 15 February 1845 and arrived 5 June 1845.

J. Gilmore

J. Gilmore, owner of convict transport William Jardine, 553 tons of 1844, brokered by Gilmore. Commenced 28 May for 270 male convicts. Sailed 11 Augsut, arrived 20 November 1844.

J. Gilmore: Citation: Data from the website www.theshipslist.com on the Net since 1999 by S. Swiggum and M. Kohli, file for Vessels Carrying Convicts from Great Britain, 1839-1846, A Return of all ships or Vessels hired for the conveyance of Convicts from Great Britain and Ireland, between the Ist January 1839 and the 30th June 1846, stating the Ships´ Names, Tonnage, Owner´s Name, Broker´s or Agent´s Name, Class of Ship, Rate of Freight, and when the same commenced, Number of Convicts taken on Board, when Sailed, when Sailed, Amount of Demurrage (if any), and whether engaged by Public Tender or otherwise- (in Continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 244, of Session 1839). All vessels were engaged by Public Tender. The original information for 1839-1846 came to government from James Meek, Comptroller of Victualling and Transport Services. The data derives from British Parliamentary Papers (BPP), LXV, (573) (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

J. W. Gray

Gray, owner of convict transport Elizabeth and Henry, 426 tons of 1844, brokered by J. W. Gray. Commenced 20 December for 200 male convicts. Sailed 15 February 1845 and arrived 5 June 1845. Otherwise still a problem person for resdearch by 2012.

J. W. Gray: Citation: Data from the website www.theshipslist.com on the Net since 1999 by S. Swiggum and M. Kohli, file for Vessels Carrying Convicts from Great Britain, 1839-1846, A Return of all ships or Vessels hired for the conveyance of Convicts from Great Britain and Ireland, between the Ist January 1839 and the 30th June 1846, stating the Ships´ Names, Tonnage, Owner´s Name, Broker´s or Agent´s Name, Class of Ship, Rate of Freight, and when the same commenced, Number of Convicts taken on Board, when Sailed, when Sailed, Amount of Demurrage (if any), and whether engaged by Public Tender or otherwise- (in Continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 244, of Session 1839). All vessels were engaged by Public Tender. The original information for 1839-1846 came to government from James Meek, Comptroller of Victualling and Transport Services. The data derives from British Parliamentary Papers (BPP), LXV, (573) (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

Year 1845

27 March 1845: T. Ward, owner of convict transport Ratcliff of 1845, 600 tons, brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 27 March 1845, 215 male convicts and two children. Sailed 12 June 1845, arrived 16 September.

6 May 1845: W. L. Pope, owner of convict transport Marion of 1845, 685 tons, brokered by Sir J. Pirie and Co. Commenced 6 May 1845, 300 male convicts. Sailed 12 June, 1845, arrived 16 September 1845.

23 May 1845; Ward, owner of convict transport Theresa of 1845, 495 tons, brokered by T. Ward. Commenced 23 May 1845, 300 male convicts. Sailed 3 July 1845, arrived 15 October 1845.

23 June 1845: G. Lewis, owner of convict transport Stratheden, 428 tons of 1845, brokered by Tiplady. Commenced 23 June for 154 male convicts. Sailed 2 August and arrived 25 December 1845.

W. H. Tiplady

W. H. Tiplady of London (died prematurely in 1848 at age 37 when at Bedford Square London, was of Royal Exchange Buildings or at George Yard, Lombard Street, partner with William Phillips), convict contractor of 1845, broker or agent for ship Stratheden owned by G. Lewis. Agent for ship Scotia of 1846 with owner Phillipps and Co. There was a firm Phillipps and Tiplady. (janus UK library search in Jardine Matheson Letters archives.) Tiplady is a name of East Yorkshire. There was a shipbroker firm William Phillips and William Henry Tiplady at Royal Exchange Buildings London. This William Phillips possibly had a daughter Millicent and possibly a son Richard C. Phillips. The firm in 1848 was possibly associated with ship chandler George Robertson of St Anne´s Place Limehouse re sale of ship Pathfinder. Was this the George Robertson who in 1822 in Glasgow married Mary Walker and in 1823 had children Colin Robertson and Elizabeth Jane R., and maybe later, sons John and James? Traded as George Robertson and Son, ships chandler?
When Tiplady died, William Phillips became partner with with Shaew and Lowther trading as Phillips Shaw and Lowther who ran clipper ships during the 1850s and 1860s.

This file remains Work-in-Progress

W. H. Tiplady: Citation: Data from the website www.theshipslist.com on the Net since 1999 by S. Swiggum and M. Kohli, file for Vessels Carrying Convicts from Great Britain, 1839-1846, A Return of all ships or Vessels hired for the conveyance of Convicts from Great Britain and Ireland, between the Ist January 1839 and the 30th June 1846, stating the Ships´ Names, Tonnage, Owner´s Name, Broker´s or Agent´s Name, Class of Ship, Rate of Freight, and when the same commenced, Number of Convicts taken on Board, when Sailed, when Sailed, Amount of Demurrage (if any), and whether engaged by Public Tender or otherwise- (in Continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 244, of Session 1839). All vessels were engaged by Public Tender. The original information for 1839-1846 came to government from James Meek, Comptroller of Victualling and Transport Services. The data derives from British Parliamentary Papers (BPP), LXV, (573) (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

Phillipps

Phillipps (William?), owner of convict transport Scotia of 1846, 657 tons, brokered by W. H. Tiplady. Commenced 18 March 1846, 300 male convicts. Sailed 28 April 1846, arrived 8 June 1846.

Phillipps: Data from the website www.theshipslist.com on the Net since 1999 by S. Swiggum and M. Kohli, file for Vessels Carrying Convicts from Great Britain, 1839-1846, A Return of all ships or Vessels hired for the conveyance of Convicts from Great Britain and Ireland, between the Ist January 1839 and the 30th June 1846, stating the Ships´ Names, Tonnage, Owner´s Name, Broker´s or Agent´s Name, Class of Ship, Rate of Freight, and when the same commenced, Number of Convicts taken on Board, when Sailed, when Sailed, Amount of Demurrage (if any), and whether engaged by Public Tender or otherwise- (in Continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 244, of Session 1839). All vessels were engaged by Public Tender. The original information for 1839-1846 came to government from James Meek, Comptroller of Victualling and Transport Services. The data derives from British Parliamentary Papers (BPP), LXV, (573) (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

G. Lewis

G. Lewis, owner of convict transport Stratheden, 428 tons of 1845, brokered by Tiplady. Commenced 23 June for 154 male convicts. Sailed 2 August and arrived 25 December 1845. Still a problem person for research by October 2012.

G. Lewis: Citation: Data from the website www.theshipslist.com on the Net since 1999 by S. Swiggum and M. Kohli, file for Vessels Carrying Convicts from Great Britain, 1839-1846, A Return of all ships or Vessels hired for the conveyance of Convicts from Great Britain and Ireland, between the Ist January 1839 and the 30th June 1846, stating the Ships´ Names, Tonnage, Owner´s Name, Broker´s or Agent´s Name, Class of Ship, Rate of Freight, and when the same commenced, Number of Convicts taken on Board, when Sailed, when Sailed, Amount of Demurrage (if any), and whether engaged by Public Tender or otherwise- (in Continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 244, of Session 1839). All vessels were engaged by Public Tender. The original information for 1839-1846 came to government from James Meek, Comptroller of Victualling and Transport Services. The data derives from British Parliamentary Papers (BPP), LXV, (573) (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

24 June 1845: T. Ward, owner of convict transport Lloyds of 1845, 495 tons, brokered by T. Ward. Commenced 24 June 1845, 170 female convicts and 30 children. Sailed 26 July 1845, arrived 7 November 1845.

15 July 1845: Lyall, owner of convict transport Mayda, 485 tons of 1845. Brokered by Lyall. Commenced 15 July, for 199 male convicts, sailed 29 August, arrived 8 January 1846.

23 July 1845: A. Riddell, owner of convict transport Tasmania of 1845, 412 tons, brokered by Devitt and Moore. Commenced 23 July 1845, 138 female convicts and 36 children. Sailed 2 September 1845, arrived 3 December 1845.

6 August 1845: Lyall, owner of convict transport Pestonjee Bomanjee, 485 tons of 1845. Brokered by Lyall. Commenced 6 August, for 299 male convicts, sailed 10 September, arrived 30 December 1845.

10 October 1845: Owner of convict transport Asia of 1845. Brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 10 October, 150 male convicts. Sailed 10 November, arrived 5 December to Gibraltar, not Australia.

12 December 1845: G. Wade, owner of convict transport Emma Eugenia of 1841, 383 tons, brokered by Lachlans and Co. Commenced 12 December 1845, 170 female convicts. Sailed 24 January 1846, arrived, not given.

Year 1846

J. Colyer

Colyer, owner convict transport Palmira, 602 tons, brokered by Lachlans and Co., Commenced 3 February 1846, 300 male convicts, sailed 8 March 1836, arrived not reported, final account not received.

J. Colyer: Citation: Data from the website www.theshipslist.com on the Net since 1999 by S. Swiggum and M. Kohli, file for Vessels Carrying Convicts from Great Britain, 1839-1846, A Return of all ships or Vessels hired for the conveyance of Convicts from Great Britain and Ireland, between the Ist January 1839 and the 30th June 1846, stating the Ships´ Names, Tonnage, Owner´s Name, Broker´s or Agent´s Name, Class of Ship, Rate of Freight, and when the same commenced, Number of Convicts taken on Board, when Sailed, when Sailed, Amount of Demurrage (if any), and whether engaged by Public Tender or otherwise- (in Continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 244, of Session 1839). All vessels were engaged by Public Tender. The original information for 1839-1846 came to government from James Meek, Comptroller of Victualling and Transport Services. The data derives from British Parliamentary Papers (BPP), LXV, (573) (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

2 March 1846: T. Ward, owner of convict transport Lord Auckland of 1846, 516 tons, brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 2 March 1846, 180 male convicts. Sailed 19 April, 1846, arrived not reported. (Final account not received.)

18 March 1846: Phillipps, owner of convict transport Scotia of 1846, 657 tons, brokered by W. H. Tiplady. Commenced 18 March 1846, 300 male convicts. Sailed 28 April 1846, arrived 8 June 1846.

W. H. Tiplady of London, convict contractor of 1845, broker or agent for ship Stratheden owned by G. Lewis. Agent for ship Scotia of 1846 with owner Phillipps and Co. There was a firm Phillipps and Tiplady. (janus UK library search in Jardine Matheson Letters archives.) Tiplady is a name of East Yorkshire. There was a shipbroker firm William Phillips and William Henry Tiplady at Royal Exchange Buildings London. This William Phillips possibly had a daughter Millicent and possibly a son Richard C. Phillips. The firm in 1848 was possibly associated with ship chandler George Robertson of St Anne´s Place Limehouse re sale of ship Pathfinder. Was this the George Robertson who in 1822 in Glasgow married Mary Walker and in 1823 had children Colin Robertson and Elizabeth Jane R., and maybe later, sons John and James? Traded as George Robertson and Son, ships chandler?

26 March 1846: R. L Hunter: Owner of convict transport John Calvin, 419 tons, brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 26 March 1846 for 200 male convicts. Sailed 12 May and arrived not reported.

26 March 1846: G. Marshall, owner of convict transport Maitland 648 tons of 1846, brokered by J. R. Edridge. Commenced 26 March 1846, 180 male convicts. Sailed 19 April, arrived ??? not given.

Presumably, one George Marshall (nd). Convict contractor? He is mentioned in Broeze on Brooks, p. 346, by 1849 as senior partner of shipbrokers Marshall and Edridge, (PRO, BT 107ff). This man dealt with John Gore who died in 1849. 1850s: We have little information on the partner of Edridge, George Marshall. He is mentioned in Broeze on Brooks, p. 346, by 1849 as a senior partner of shipbrokers Marshall and Edridge, (PRO, BT 107ff), this man dealt with John Gore who died in 1849. He has close links to former partner Thomas Edridge (see below).

G. Marshall

G. Marshall, owner of convict transport Maitland 648 tons of 1846, brokered by J. R. Edridge. Commenced 26 March 1846, 180 male convicts. Sailed 19 April, arrived ??? not given. Otherwise still a problem person for research by October 2012.

Presumably, one George Marshall (nd). Convict contractor? He is mentioned in Broeze on Brooks, p. 346, by 1849 as senior partner of shipbrokers Marshall and Edridge, (PRO, BT 107ff). This man dealt with John Gore who died in 1849. He has close links to former partner Thomas Edridge (see above).

G. Marshall: Citation: Data from the website www.theshipslist.com on the Net since 1999 by S. Swiggum and M. Kohli, file for Vessels Carrying Convicts from Great Britain, 1839-1846, A Return of all ships or Vessels hired for the conveyance of Convicts from Great Britain and Ireland, between the Ist January 1839 and the 30th June 1846, stating the Ships´ Names, Tonnage, Owner´s Name, Broker´s or Agent´s Name, Class of Ship, Rate of Freight, and when the same commenced, Number of Convicts taken on Board, when Sailed, when Sailed, Amount of Demurrage (if any), and whether engaged by Public Tender or otherwise- (in Continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 244, of Session 1839). All vessels were engaged by Public Tender. The original information for 1839-1846 came to government from James Meek, Comptroller of Victualling and Transport Services. The data derives from British Parliamentary Papers (BPP), LXV, (573) (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

J. R. Edridge (Thomas??)

J. R. Edridge (nd). His name is sometimes given, even in contemporary documents, such as a London Gazette item, as Eldridge. Probably of the shipbroker/shipping agency firm Marshall and Edridge, which was active on the Australian run by the 1850s. Yhey used an agent in Cork, one Denis Brennan of Merchant's Quay there. Marshall and Edridge were a London convict contractor by 1839, as broker or agent for Isabella Watson owned by H. Russell. A website has data on The Light of the Age, a fast and large wooden clipper ship originally named the Beacon Light, and described as a "Californian clipper" being used in that trade. There has been some confusion over over the Light of the Age's original name and date of construction, however research has confirmed it to have been originally built as the Beacon Light, 1280/1320 tons built in 1855 by Jotham A. Stetson in Chelsea, Massachusetts. It was renamed Light of the Age in 1857 by Marshall and Edridge of London (of 34 Fenchurch Street, shipping agents who handled for example the emigrant ship to Australia, Kate of 1854). Marshall and Edridge sold it in 1862 to Thomas M. Mackay of London. Thomas Mackay and James Baines of Liverpool had a "fraternal arrangement" and were the main partners, along with others, who operated as the famous Black Ball Line of Australian Packets that carried hundreds of thousands of immigrants to Australia between 1852 and 1866. Between 1862-1866 the Light of the Age made several voyages to Australia under the Black Ball Line flag, mainly employed on the London to Queensland run carrying emigrants.

J. R. Edridge (Thomas??): Citation: Data from the website www.theshipslist.com on the Net since 1999 by S. Swiggum and M. Kohli, file for Vessels Carrying Convicts from Great Britain, 1839-1846, A Return of all ships or Vessels hired for the conveyance of Convicts from Great Britain and Ireland, between the Ist January 1839 and the 30th June 1846, stating the Ships´ Names, Tonnage, Owner´s Name, Broker´s or Agent´s Name, Class of Ship, Rate of Freight, and when the same commenced, Number of Convicts taken on Board, when Sailed, when Sailed, Amount of Demurrage (if any), and whether engaged by Public Tender or otherwise- (in Continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 244, of Session 1839). All vessels were engaged by Public Tender. The original information for 1839-1846 came to government from James Meek, Comptroller of Victualling and Transport Services. The data derives from British Parliamentary Papers (BPP), LXV, (573) (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

We have little information on the partner of Edridge, George Marshall. He is mentioned in Broeze on Brooks, p. 346, by 1849 as a senior partner of shipbrokers Marshall and Edridge, (PRO, BT 107ff), this man dealt with John Gore who died in 1849. He has close links to former partner Thomas Edridge.

26 March 1846: W. L. Pope, owner of convict transport Sea Queen of 1846, 404 tons, brokered by Sir J. Pirie and Co. Commenced 26 March 1846, 170 female convicts. Sailed 11 May 1846, arrived not given (destination not stated).

29 April 1846: W. Matheson, owner of convict transport Thetis 518 tons of 1846, brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 29 April 1846, 60 male convicts. Sailed 5 June, arrived 23 June to Gibraltar not Australia.

W. Matheson

W. Matheson, owner of convict transport Thetis 518 tons of 1846, brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 29 April 1846, 60 male convicts. Sailed 5 June, arrived 23 June to Gibraltar not Australia. Otherwise still a problem person for research by October 2012.

W. Matheson: Citation: Data from the website www.theshipslist.com on the Net since 1999 by S. Swiggum and M. Kohli, file for Vessels Carrying Convicts from Great Britain, 1839-1846, A Return of all ships or Vessels hired for the conveyance of Convicts from Great Britain and Ireland, between the Ist January 1839 and the 30th June 1846, stating the Ships´ Names, Tonnage, Owner´s Name, Broker´s or Agent´s Name, Class of Ship, Rate of Freight, and when the same commenced, Number of Convicts taken on Board, when Sailed, when Sailed, Amount of Demurrage (if any), and whether engaged by Public Tender or otherwise- (in Continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 244, of Session 1839). All vessels were engaged by Public Tender. The original information for 1839-1846 came to government from James Meek, Comptroller of Victualling and Transport Services. The data derives from British Parliamentary Papers (BPP), LXV, (573) (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

1850s: J. R. Edridge (nd). His name is sometimes given, even in contemporary documents, such as a London Gazette item, as Eldridge. Probably of the shipbroker/shipping agency firm Marshall and Edridge, which was active on the Australian run by the 1850s. They used an agent in Cork, one Denis Brennan of Merchant's Quay there. Marshall and Edridge were a London convict contractor by 1839, as broker or agent for Isabella Watson owned by H. Russell. A website has data on The Light of the Age, a fast and large wooden clipper ship originally named the Beacon Light, and described as a "Californian clipper" being used in that trade. There has been some confusion over over the Light of the Age's original name and date of construction, however research has confirmed it to have been originally built as the Beacon Light, 1280/1320 tons built in 1855 by Jotham A. Stetson in Chelsea, Massachusetts. It was renamed Light of the Age in 1857 by Marshall and Edridge of London (of 34 Fenchurch Street, shipping agents who handled for example the emigrant ship to Australia, Kate of 1854). Marshall and Edridge sold it in 1862 to Thomas M. Mackay of London. Thomas Mackay and James Baines of Liverpool had a "fraternal arrangement" and were the main partners, along with others, who operated as the famous Black Ball Line of Australian Packets that carried hundreds of thousands of immigrants to Australia between 1852 and 1866. Between 1862-1866 the Light of the Age made several voyages to Australia under the Black Ball Line flag, mainly employed on the London to Queensland run carrying emigrants.

According to Bateson, The Convict Ships, and various other sources, between 1850 and 1869, the last convict contractors sending convicts to Australia were Duncan Dunbar II (as the largest single operator), Dunbar and Allan (?). J. Allan. Somes. Perhaps one Green (R. H. Green?). And J. H Luscombe.

1844++: Convict contractor John Henry Luscombe (1797-1883) of The grove Church Road, Upper Norwood South London. Married to Clara Bristow and employed her brother Frank Bristow as ships captain. Owner of convict ship Norwood. Largely known as two of his sons were famous UK footballers. He married at age 50. See Bateson, p. 309. Had ships to New Zealand in 1850s. He employed his wife´s brother 1856-1870 Captain Frank Bristow mostly on ship Norwood, which carried convicts to WA, in 1860 it was chartered to carry solders to the Maori Wars, New Zealand. Norwood was later sold to H. Wake of London then to J. Bonus and Sons of London.

>

After transportation ceased to Australia, it continued for some years to Gibraltar and Bermuda.

There is a website on vicnet.net.au by Grahame Thom for the period 1816-1867 on Convict Ships- Medical Journals. By this time, the private contractors usually employed the ships surgeons.

Year 1847

Transport Joseph Somes is sent by Somes. (See Bateson, Convict Ships, Appendices.)

Year 1848

Transport Marion is sent by W. L. Pope and Pirie. (See Bateson, Convict Ships, Appendices.)

Year 1849

Transport Anna Maria is sent by Not listed (See Bateson, Convict Ships, Appendices.)

Year 1850

Transport Scindian is sent. (See Bateson, Convict Ships, Appendices for WA.)

Year 1851

Transport Pyrenees is sent by Dunbar. Transport Minden is sent by Dunbar. (See Bateson, Convict Ships, Appendices for WA.)

Note: 1851: February, Formation of Australasian League to stop convict transportation.

Year 1852

Transport Marion is sent by either W. L. Pope or Pirie. (See Bateson, Convict Ships, Appendices for WA.)

1852: August 1852, Formation of Australasian Gold Mining Co. with names such as Lambert and Parbury its promoters, with directors Brooks, Buckle, Cummins, Flower, Jackson, Lambert, Fanning, Parbury, Thacker and Walker, with its auditors being George Hay Donaldson and John Benedict Gore.
(Broeze, Robert Brooks, p. 239.)

1853: In 1853 Robert Brooks became involved in Australasian Coal Mining Co, with Brooks, Campbell and Mangles, and two directors of the London Chartered Bank of Australia, Fane de Salis and Mr Hadow, plus James Hartley and P&O's chairman, Sir James Matheson, re coal for steam shipping.
(Broeze, Robert Brooks, p. 242.)

Year 1853

At right: Image of the Edwin Fox

Transport Pyrenees is sent by Dunbar. Transport Phoebe Dunbar is sent by Dunbar. (See Bateson, Convict Ships, Appendices for WA.)

Year 1854

Transport Ramillies is sent by Dunbar. Transport Sea Park is sent by Dunbar. See Bateson, Convict Ships, Appendices for WA.)

Year 1855

Transport Stag is sent by not listed. (See Bateson, Convict Ships, Appendices for WA.)

Year 1856

Transport Runnymede is sent by not listed. Transport William Hammond is sent by not listed. (See Bateson, Convict Ships, Appendices for WA.)

Year 1857

Transport Clara is sent by not listed. (See Bateson, Convict Ships, Appendices for WA.)

Year 1858

Convict transport Nile is sent by Dunbar. Lord Raglan sent by Dunbar. Edwin Fox is sent by Dunbar. (See Bateson, Convict Ships, Appendices for WA.)

Year 1859

Convict transport Sultana sent by Dunbar. (See Bateson, Convict Ships, Appendices for WA.)

Year 1860

No transport listed. (See Bateson, Convict Ships, Appendices for WA.)

Year 1861

Convict transport Palmerston, owner not given. (See Bateson, Convict Ships, Appendices for WA.)

Year 1862

Convict transport York is sent by Allan. Transport Lincelles is sent by Dunbar/Allan. (See Bateson, Convict Ships, Appendices for WA.)

Year 1863

Convict transport Clyde is sent by Somes. Transport Merchantman is sent by Somes. (See Bateson, Convict Ships, Appendices for WA.)

Year 1864

1864: Convict transport Merchantman is sent by Somes. (See Bateson, Convict Ships, Appendices re Western Australia.)

Year 1865

1865: Convict transport Vimiera is sent by Green or Dunbar. (See Bateson, Convict Ships, Appendices re Western Australia.)

Year 1866

1866-1867: Convict ship Corona from Portland to WESTERN AUSTRALIA departing 16 Oct., 1866 (?). Departing England? 22 Dec 1868, convict ship Corona Capt. Wm S. Crudace, owned by William S. Crudace, later a prominent Dundee shipowner.

Captain William S. Crudace/Croudace (born 1821 in Leeds). Had his first command at age 21 on ships from Dundee for Baltic ports. Sailed for noted Glasgow shipowner Alexander Stephen and married his daughter Elspeth. Crudace went to Melbourne in 1855 on White Eagle 993 tons from Glasgow in April 1855 with general cargo. Convict contractor. Shipowner in Scotland. Ship Corona was built at Dundee in 1866. 1199 tpns, built on an iron frame and then planked. Largest merchant ship in the convict service to WA, was on her maiden voyage. After 1866 Crudace left the sea and worked at acquiring his own vessels including a few whalers. His wife had a relative William Stephen who built ships for J and F. Somes of London.

1866: Convict transport Belgravia is sent by Somes. (See Bateson, Convict Ships, Appendices re Western Australia.)

Year 1867

Departs 18 April 1867 from Portland, convict transport Norwood 2, 786 tons, Capt. Frank Bristow. Surgeon W. M. Saunders. Direct to WESTERN AUSTRALIA 86 days, 254 prisoners, arriving 13 July, 1867. Owned by J. H. Luscombe.
The contract for Norwood 2 dated 2 March, 1867, 254 named males, Data from PRO, TS18/514 Guide to Archives. This ship on 28 March, 1867, (per Alexandra Hasluck re Sykes), took some prisoners at the Nore, to Portsmouth, 2 April, 1867, then to Portland. Though Hasluck has it that she departed 2 April, 1867, the second-last convict ship to Australia.

Year 1868

1868: Convict transport Hougoumount is sent by J. H. Luscombe. (The last convict transport Bateson lists, see Bateson, Convict Ships, Appendices re Western Australia.)

Contract for convict ship Hougoumont dated 15 Oct., 1867, 280 named males, destination unknown, Data from PRO, TS18/515 Guide to Archives.
Other notes: Departs 12 Oct., 1867: London: convict transport Hougoumount, 875 tons, Capt. Wm. Cozens, surgeon unnamed, from London. 89 days to WESTERN AUSTRALIA, Arriving 9 Jan. 1868. Owned by Luscombe. The last convict ship of all! See AGL Shaw, Convicts and the Colonies, p. 358. She carried sixty Fenians to complete, as Shaw writes, the tally of political prisoners sent to Australia. Shaw, p. 368 says that between 1854-1868, WESTERN AUSTRALIA received 7065 convicts, and (p. 358), the last six "Imperial" convicts in WESTERN AUSTRALIA were pardoned in 1906, at the instigation of Alfred Deakin, then the Australian prime minister.

The last convict ship of all: Hasluck records that Luscombes owned Hougoumont, which arrived WESTERN AUSTRALIA as the last convict ship to Fremantle. She had originally been one of Dunbar's fleet, but now belonged to Luscombes of London. She carried John Boyle O'Reilly, the Irish political prisoner who wrote Moondyne, who later escaped to America.


On owners of migrant (non-convict) shipping

Follows a list of possibly useful sources drawn from wide-ranging netsurfing ...
Comber Index: Rev. William Charles Comber (NZ), Card Index, Shipping to New Zealand 1839-1889. (A chronological listing of ships to New Zealand with ship names, tonnage, captain, date and place of sailing and arrival, no passenger information, somertimes gives shipowner name)
David Dobson, Ships from Scotland to Australasia 1820-1860. FAMHIS 387.209411, 2005. (Alphabetical by ship name)
Vaughan Evans, Maritime Resources for Historians and Genealogists. PAM 929.2072 - 1988.
Davenport and Mottram, Early Shipping in Moreton Bay, Vol. 1, June 1846-Dec 1859, Vol. 2 1860-1863. FAMHIS 387.2, 1998.
Laxon and Perry, BI: The British India Steam Navigation Company Limited. FAMHIS 387.5065. (Concerned with Queensland Ports)
Lloyd´s Register of British and Foreign Shipping.
John Maber, North Star to Southern Cross. FAMHIS 387.50994 1967. (Covers ships organized under shipping lines)
Ian Nicholson, books various.
Ronald Parsons, Australian shipowners and their fleets. PAM 387.5240994, 1985.
Ronald Parsons, Ships of Australia and New Zealand before 1850: details of ships registered with the customs at ports in Australia. G 387.20994, 1983.
Ronald Parsons, Southern Passages: a maritime history of South Australia. G 387.5099423, 1986.
Ronald Parsons, Migrant Ships to South Australia 1836-1866. G 325.94, 1999.
Pennie Pemberton, Pure Merinoes and Others: The ¨Shipping Lists¨ of the Australian Agricultural Company. 1986. online in PDF format
F. Rhodes, Pageant of the Pacific: being the maritime history of Australia. GR 994, 1937.
Index: Norma Tuck, Ships Muster Index: Passengers and Crew departing NSW 1816-1825.
Website: Western Australia: 1829 Shipping Arrivals to the Swan River Colony. From Western Australian Genealogical Society.
Website: Highlands and Islands Emigration Society Passenger Lists (1852-1857).
Website: Mariners and Ships in Australian Waters, from State records of NSW
Website by Elizabeth Rushen: First Female Emigration Scheme between Great Britain and the Australian colonies, Emigration Commission of 1831-1832 and the work of London Emigration Committee of 1833-1836 followed by government and private enterprise schemes to encourage female emigration re agents John Marshall and James Denholm Pinnock.
London Emigration Committee (LEC) (1833-1836): Edward Forster (Chair), Nadir Baxter, Charles Holte Bracebridge, Bishop William Grant Broughton, William Crawford, Capel Cure, Sir George Hampson, Samuel Hoare, Thomas Lewin, George Long, Charles Lushington, Sir (William) Edward Parry, Henry Walter Parker, Col. Charles Beaumont Phipps, Sir John Pirie, Capt. Daniel Pring, John Stuckey Reynolds, John Abel Smith, (Samuel) Henry Sterry and John Taylor.
Dublin Emigration Committee (1834-1836): Richard Cane (Chair), Thomas Abbott, Thomas Black Cawood, Rev Matthew Flanagan,George French, James Scott Molloy, Daniel Porter, William Willans, Surgeon Thomas Wright.
Cork Emigration Committee (1832-1836): Peter Besnard (Chair 1832), William Crawford (Chair 1834-1836), Robert Delacour Beamish, Rev George J.M. Brennan, Joseph King Cummins, Rev John Egan, Rev M. Horgan, Samuel Lane, Daniel Leahy, Rev John N. Lombard, Joseph Leycester, Rev Theobald Mathew, Daniel Meagher, James Murphy, Rev William O'Connor, Rev Michael B. O'Shea, Rev Dr Quarry, Rev Daniel P. Talvey, Robert Twiss, Lt Charles Friend RN, HM Agent for Emigration


See also:
Ronald Parsons, Trying to find a seafaring ancestor. Gunmarcha, S.A. Gould Books, 1988. 929.1 PAR - Recommended as a good starting point for Australian sources.
Margaret Chambers (Compiler), Finding families: The genealogist's guide to the National Archives of Australia. Sydney, Hale & Iremonger, 1998. REF 929.934 NAT An excellent guide to the records held by Australian archives. Covers both merchant shipping records and navy records.
Jim Melton, Ships' deserters 1852-1900. Sydney, Library of Australian History, 1986. REF 359.1334 MEL - ()Always check this reliable source in case your ancestor deserted rather than immigrated, a common practice in the early days!.
Rod Dickson, The history of the whalers on the south coast of New Holland from 1800-1888. Carlisle, W.A., Hesperian Press, 2007. REF 639.280994 DIC (If you ancestors were whalers this may prove very useful as it details whaling voyages to Australia, listing ships with a short profile of the vessel and in some cases, information about the crew)
N. A. M. Rodger, Naval Records for Genealogists. London, HMSO, 1988. REF 929.341 ROD - A very comprehensive work covering the Royal Navy. And, Bruno Pappalardo, Tracing your naval ancestors. London, Pubic Record Office, 2003.



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